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SEER Training Modules

Nuclear Scans

Gallium Scan

Radiographic imaging of the body, which measures the amount of the radioisotope gallium that is concentrated in a specific part of the body. It is most useful in detecting nodal disease above the diaphragm. Also called: Gallium-67 scintigraphy, Ga67 scan, high dose (8-11 mCi) gallium scan.

Key words/possible involvement:
Area of increased density, area of enhanced contrast, area of high radioactivity, space occupying lesion, diffuse nodularity, decreased uptake, decreased activity.

Other words/no involvement:
If there is no specific reference to visible abnormality of the organs in the abdomen, retroperitoneum, or pelvis.

Parotid or Salivary Gland Scan

Used to detect blockage of the salivary gland ducts and tumors of the major salivary glands.

Key words/possible involvement:
Area of increased uptake, hotspot, area of decreased uptake, cold spot, space occupying lesion, mass, enlargement, metastases.

Other words/no involvement:
If there is no specific reference to visible abnormality, blockage or tumor, as well as references to calcifications, vascular abnormalities, congenital anomalies, and other benign conditions.

Thyroid Scan

Also called:
Radionuclide scan, I-131 or I-123 scan, technetium-99m pertechnetate scan.

Key words/possible involvement:
Area of decreased uptake, cold spot, nonfunctioning nodule, area of decreased concentration, mass, nodule, space occupying lesion.

Other words/no involvement:
If there is no specific reference to visible abnormality, normal function, size, shape, and position, as well as references to vascular abnormalities, benign adenomas, congenital anomalies, and other benign conditions.